Recent Work

Here are some of the most recent works I completed for my customers around the world.

On the bench today, an Otto Link Tone Master 3* for Alto saxophone

This is not something I see very often out here in South East Asia. This vintage piece is I believe close to 80 years old and was first released around 1940.

This piece was in decent condition when I received it but unfortunately, it had a chipped tip rail which needed fixing. Given the good overall condition and the fact that the original tip opening stamp on the table was still intact, I decided to take the minimalist approach to preserve all the original features of this piece.

I carefully removed the chip on the tip rail by slightly opening the mouthpiece by only .002″ and then re-lay a new facing curve matching the new tip without interfering with the table which was already flat.

I was very surprised by the final results. I do not usually like metal Links on alto but this one was great with a full dark sound and good articulation.

It’s now back on its way to the United States.

On the bench today, an ARB Arbex 4*S for Tenor saxophone

This piece had no major flaws or defects but the owner wanted to open it slightly and make it more freeblowing.

After opening the tip, I applied a radial facing curve and balanced the rails.

A good player with a vintage and compact sound.

On the bench today, a Vandoren V16 T7 Medium Chamber for Tenor saxophone

The owner of this wanted a more freeblowing piece with better sub-tones and improved altissimo.

In itself, this piece had a very good facing curve to start with but it was not the curve that fitted the player. Also, the baffle was not properly adjusted which resulted in some stuffiness.

After laying a new elliptical curve and balancing the baffle, this mouthpiece has gained in the lower register, it is fuller and lusher with easy articulation.

A very nice link style piece going back to Thailand.

On the bench today, an Eastern Music DG Fat Boy for Tenor saxophone

Yes, it is another Eastern Music DG Fat Boy tenor mouthpiece coming in for the “fattening” mod!

The initial tip opening was .112″ which I decided to keep. I then did all my standard modification work on the baffle and chamber to improve voicing and add more body to the sound. I also thinned down the tip rail.

The addition of a radial facing curve makes it very responsive with great articulation and a big rich sound with a fat lower register and a full upper register.

On the bench today, a SYOS Signature “Knoel Scott” 8 for Baritone saxophone

This came in with the usual complaint about the “weird buzz” so I explained that in order to remove that buzz, the table needs to be smoothed out completely to improve reed seal and therefore reed vibration.

While I was analyzing this piece, I also quickly realized that the tip opening was rather off. A Tip 8 baritone is advertised by the manufacturer as .120″ but the opening of this piece was actually .113″ which places it in between a Tip 7 and 7* for baritone.

I proceeded with sanding down the table to a flat, smooth surface followed by a full refacing and applied a radial facing curve. I also tried to increase the tip opening slightly but due to the way these pieces are constructed, big openings are not possible without risking the piece to flake out with layers of plastic peeling off.

After refacing, this piece has gained power, resonance and is punchier than ever.

On the bench today, a Conn mouthpiece for C-Melody saxophone

This is the first C-Melody mouthpiece I get to work on. These are quite rare in South East Asia so it was quite fun to work on it.

This Conn mouthpiece had a very smooth and regular facing curve and a very flat table but the combination of a tiny tip opening (.062″), extra large chamber, no baffle and very scooped side walls made it very dull and tubby without any projection at all.

In order to make it play with a bit more punch and sizzle, I opened up the tip to .080″ without resorting to shortening the overall length of the mouthpiece, which can affect tuning. I then applied an elliptical curve with a radius of 6 giving it a nice dynamic/percussive character and I lengthened the facing length to increase presence. And in addition, and perhaps more importantly, I crafted a small clamshell baffle with the excess material leftover after the tip opening to add some projection and “sparkle” into the sound.

I am very happy with the results and I hope the owner will enjoy this piece with his beautifully restored Conn C-Melody saxophone.

On the bench today, an Eastern Music DG Fat Boy for Tenor saxophone

Yet another Eastern Music DG Fat Boy tenor mouthpiece coming in for a “fattening” mod.

The initial tip opening was a perfect .110″. I decided to open it up to .112″ and then did all my standard modification work on the baffle and chamber to improve voicing and add more body to the sound.

The addition of a radial facing curve makes it very responsive with great articulation and a big rich sound with a fat lower register. I m starting to like this more and more!

On the bench today, a SYOS Signature “Michael Wilbur” 7* for Tenor saxophone

When the owner sent it to me, he also complained about the “weird buzz” in the sound which is primarily due to the printing marks on the table and along the facing curve. It is quite easily fixed with a full reface.

Furthermore, the tip opening measured .101″ instead of .105″ for a 7*. After flattening the table, I opened up the tip and re-lay a new radial facing curve and then finished the work by trimming the side rails and reshaping the tip.

This a very response piece with the small step baffle but it has a lot of presence with the scooped side walls and the medium large chamber. Overall, I like it.

Get in touch in you also find your 3D printed piece to lack a little something.

On the bench today, an Eastern Music T7 for Tenor saxophone

This is the first time I see this piece and I am not entirely sure about its actual name. I just know it is made by Eastern Music in China. Overall, this was a very good player out of the box but its owner wanted the tip to be a little bigger and he also wanted to add a bit more “meat” to the sound.

After opening the tip to .107″, I re-voiced the piece by working on the step baffle and the chamber. Finally, I applied a new free-blowing facing curve.

This piece is super responsive with insanely fast articulation and a big rich sound. I was very pleasantly surprised.

On the bench today, a SYOS Signature “Dayna Stephens” 6* for Soprano saxophone

This is the second one of these that I work on and it has become my favorite large chamber soprano mouthpiece. It is such a good design.

When the owner sent it to me, he complained about a “weird buzz” with this piece. I call this weird buzz, the hollow buzz and it is primarily due to the printing marks on the table and along the facing curve. It is quite easily fixed with a full reface.

In addition to the refacing, the tip rail, side rails and tip shape were worked on to improve articulation and add body to the sound.

This piece is now back in Switzerland. Get in touch in you also find your 3D printed piece to lack a little something.

On the bench today, a Lamberson F Maj 7 for Alto saxophone

This piece was playing fine but it was a little too resistant for its owner.

Upon measuring the curve, it showed a perfect elliptical curve with a ratio of “5”, a tip opening of .084″ and a facing length of 36mm which made it rather resistant.

I proceed with increasing the facing length slightly and lowered the ratio of the curve to “3” to reduce the resistance a little while maintaining the same tip opening and retaining a good feedback to the player.

This is a very nice and versatile piece which would be at ease in a lot of various settings.

(Once again, sorry for the poor lighting conditions on the photos!)

On the bench today, a Selmer Super Session “E” for Soprano saxophone

Yet another Selmer Super Session for soprano saxophone and I still love it!

This time it is an “E” tip opening and the owner wanted it opened up to an “F” tip. He also wanted more power, better articulation and more edge.

For this, I applied my usual combination of facing curve + facing length for the Super Session and I re-balanced the baffle entirely to facilitate sound emission, improve articulation and increase projection.

On the bench today, a Brilhart Ebolin 3 for Alto saxophone

This piece was playing fine but it was a little boring with no sizzle and a little too dark and dull.

I modified it with a new facing curve, slightly reduced the facing length and added a tiny rollover baffle to bring a bit more edge into the sound.

Overall, it is a very satisfying piece if you like the Brilhart sounds.

Now back with its owner in the United Kingdom.

On the bench today, an Eastern Music DG FatBay Tenor saxophone

This is the third DG FatBoy i got to work on in as many months. Nothing particularly wrong with these pieces. In fact, they play very well but they do lack a bit of body so I provide a standard modification package on them.

This particular piece had a tip opening of .107″ and my customer wanted a tip of .120″ which starts to fall into the “extreme” opening territory requiring extensive baffle work.

I applied a radial facing curve with a long facing length for a richer lower register without sacrificing the screaming upper register. I also worked on re-voicing the piece by slightly enlarging the chamber and tweaking the baffle.

This is so far, my favorite of the one I worked on.

On the bench today, a Ted Klum Florida HR 7 for Tenor saxophone

Straight away, I must say this is a drop dead gorgeous looking, sounding and playing mouthpiece.

There were no major flaws with this piece except for damages to the tip rail and minor imperfections along the facing curve. Unfortunately, in order to correct the damaged tip, I needed to reface the piece entirely.

I stayed within the original parameters set by Ted Klum and refaced entirely this piece. It plays beautifully has intended and it is in my top 5 of the best pieces I got to play this year.

On the bench today, a Retro Revival Super “D” NY 8* Tenor saxophone

It is funny how things work out in life, I had this piece at the same time I also had the Otto Link STM “Double Ring” which allowed me to compare both. Although the Retro Revival Super “D” is a great piece, it is no match to the original STM “Double Ring” in my opinion.

On this piece, the owner wanted the tip reduced from .113″ to .100″ and have a free blowing piece.

In order to achieve this, I shaved down the table and applied a radial curve. I also thinned down and shaped the tip rail to improve articulation.

This is a brilliant piece but slightly too bright to my own taste for a “Double Ring”.

This is now back in South Korea.

On the bench today, an Otto Link Super Tone Master “Florida” 8 for Tenor saxophone

Again, not something I see very often on my bench but definitely not as rare as the previous “Double Ring”.

This piece was in pretty bad shape when I got it and the tip opening at .114″ was too big for its owner.

I brought the tip opening down to its original size at .110″ and relay a new facing curve. I also balanced the baffle and re-shaped the tip rail which was very uneven.

The piece is now back to “Florida” standard and plays superbly.

(Apologies for the poor final photos which does not give justice to this piece)

On the bench today, an Otto Link Supe” Tone Master “Double Ring NY” 5* for Tenor saxophone

This is not something I get to see very often here in Singapore but it is an absolute joy to work on these historical pieces.

This piece had been opened up to .108″ before by someone who did not fully know what he was doing. There was no tip rail at all, the baffle had been modified, the facing length was too short and the facing curve was bad.

After discussing with my client, we decided to go with a .107″ tip opening with a slightly longer facing length. I advised to go with an elliptical curve to stay in line with the original vibe of the piece.

After carefully relaying the curve, I slowly worked in the baffle until I found the sweet spot. The baffle is not perfectly symmetrical but once I feel that the piece plays as it was originally designed to do, I stop the work to avoid removing too much material.

This piece is now back with its owner in Germany.

(Apologies for the poor final photos which does not give justice to this piece)

On the bench today, a WoodWind C. Steel Ebonite “B4” for Soprano saxophone

A nice little player which needed a bit of TLC to take it to its full potential.

I slightly opened the tip, relayed a new facing curve, balanced the side rail thickness, re-shaped the tip and balanced the baffle.

I was surprised by the end result, this piece plays with a very pleasant dark and full sound.

On the bench today, a Selmer Super Session “G” for Soprano saxophone

At the risk of repeating myself once again, this is one of my favorite soprano mouthpiece. I like everything about it from the design to the sound and the quality fo the hard rubber. That’s why my own ASC “Scirocco” soprano mouthpiece is inspired by it.

This piece had the usual QC errors found on a lot of older Selmer pieces (QC at Selmer is a lot better these days!) and it needed a full reface to flatten the table, correct the facing curve, balance the baffle and re-shape the tip rail.

After the modification work, this piece plays as sweet as it was designed to be.

On the bench today, an Eastern Music DG FatBoy for Tenor saxophone

This was an other cool “FatBoy” modification. This piece originally had a tip opening of .110″ with a harsh baffle and lots of tooling marks inside the chamber.

I did slightly open the tip to .112″ and works on the baffle area to improve air flow. I also worked on the chamber to smooth it out and slightly enlarge it to add body to the sound.

Once again, I am really impressed by the quality of this piece after modification.

This is now going back to the United Kingdom.

On the bench today, a RPC 80B for Alto saxophone

This mouthpiece had a bad epoxy baffle added to it at some point in its life and the my customer wanted it removed without doing any other modifications to it.

While I was removing the baffle, I also took the opportunity to measure the facing curve. I quickly realised that the tip opening was completely off and the facing curve was pretty bad too. After discussing with my customer, he decided to reduce the tip opening slightly to bring it closer to .080″ and reface the piece to correct the facing curve. I also reshaped the tip rail to be closer to an original RPC mouthpiece.

This piece now plays very well and it is within RPC specifications.

On the bench today, a John Reilly mouthpiece for Alto saxophone

I have no idea about the actual model name of this mouthpiece. I just know that they are/were (?) made on order by John Reilly in the US.

This mouthpiece had an epoxy baffle added to it at some point in its life and the my customer wanted it removed without doing any other modifications to it.

While I was removing the baffle, I also took the opportunity to measure the facing curve and I must say it was one of the best I have seen this year. Mr Reilly knows what he is doing! This is a nice piece.

On the bench today, a Tenor Madness EBII 7* for Tenor saxophone

This piece had a huge baffle, almost to the point of being a caricature! It was improperly set-up and way too high. The side rails were also too thick and the tip rail was undefined which affected articulation. In addition, the table was not flat and the tip opening only measured .099”.

I decided to open it up to a true 7* at .105″ and go for a slightly elliptical curve to add some resistance and bit of “snap” in the sound. I completely re-balanced the baffle to brought it down to a normal EB standard.

The baffle and chamber still need to be polished but it is already a nice improvement compare to its original condition.

On the bench today, an Otto Link Tone Edge EB 5 (Refaced) for Tenor saxophone

This was a bit of a disaster. It was refaced during a 15min session by one of the travelling refacers and it was, as expected in these conditions, a very rushed job which resulted in a bad facing curve, rough table and a very badly set-up baffle. The mouthpiece played very badly and completely lost its “EB” characteristics.

A full reface job was done with complete balancing of the baffle to bring back life into this piece. My customer is now happy to have this piece back in near original sounding condition.

On the bench today, an AM Mouthpieces AMSS 6 for Alto saxophone

This piece had no major issues but my customer wanted it to be more freeblowing to match his playing style.

I applied a new facing curve which I knew would match his preference and I adjusted the tip rail and baffle for better articulation and voicing. I also thinned the side rails.

I liked this piece so much, I actually ordered one from Arnold Montgomery immediately after I finished this piece!

On the bench today, an AM Mouthpieces Augie Bello 8* for Tenor saxophone

When my customer brought this piece to me, he explained that it was too resistant with the lower and upper registers being stuffy.

After checking the curve and the baffle, I decided to apply a new radial facing curve and slightly increase the facing length. I also re-worked the sides of the baffle and smoothed out the drop into the chamber. Finally, I did some minor adjustments into the chamber.

After the custom work, this piece speaks a lot better than before and plays evenly throughout all registers.

This is a nice piece if you are into step baffle mouthpieces.

On the bench today, a SYOS Custom “B258/5S – 28526” (Refaced) for Tenor saxophone

This mouthpiece had a decent facing curve but the voicing was problematic. It was stuffy and lacked clarity.

Upon inspection, it appear that the tip rail and the sides of the baffle had not been finished by the previous travelling refacer during his 15min session.

It was a very simple job that only took 5 minutes to complete which I gladly did free of charge for a returning customer.

This piece now plays as it should with a surprisingly fat sound despite the huge step baffle.

On the bench today, a Brilhart Personaline S9 (Serial 70979 – Refaced by James Bunte) for Tenor saxophone

I am actually not entirely sure about the tip opening and the serial number but that’s the numbers I could make up on the body.

As the photos show, this piece had a chipped tip. Luckily the owner kept the chipped piece which I could put back together using safe epoxy. It is always a better option instead of having to sculpt the tip out of putty.

The facing curve was left intact but the tip rail had to be slightly reshaped after the work. This is a great player. James did a good job with the tip opening to .104″ and the facing curve.

Get in touch if you are in a similar situation. There is always a solution to bring your favorite mouthpiece back to life!

On the bench today, an Eastern Music DG Fat Boy for Tenor saxophone

This project was a very pleasant surprised. I was not expecting this particular piece to be of such high quality given the initial price. In fact, it was technically perfect out of the box except for the sound that was a little thin but otherwise it was a good player with a sound similar to a DG Studio model.

My customer wanted to open the tip from .105″ to .118″ and make it sound like a DG MBII model.

After opening the tip, I lengthened the facing curve, applied a new radial facing curve and re-balanced the baffle. I then thinned the side rails and tip rail and finally worked on the chamber/throat area to re-voice the piece and increase its core.

This piece is simply awesome. It is one of the best Guardala copy I have tried and that includes some pieces that are 4-5 times more expensive.

On the bench today, a Brilhart Ebolin 3* (Serial 218690) for Tenor saxophone

This was a personal project of mine. I must say straight away that it would not make economical sense for my customers to ask for this sort of modifications on this sort of pieces.

My goal was to do a full restoration and a massive tip opening to bring it to a modern tip size of 7/.100”.

I started by the grey goo that was put over part of the bite plate by the previous owner. It revealed that the original bite plate was badly damaged by tooth marks, as expected. I removed all the original material and applied a new acrylic bite plate in marble white..

Once the cosmetic side were dealt with, I opened up the tip from .072” to .100”. That was a massive opening which of course ended reducing the overall length of the mouthpiece and therefore its final position along the neck.

Finally, I did extensive work on the baffle, throat, chamber and window to voice and balance the piece.

This was a huge amount of work but I believe I succeeded in bring it back to the 21st century with a modern tip opening and a nice thick sound. It is a little darker than I would have liked after I slightly overshot on the balancing of the baffle. Nonetheless, it is now an excellent player.

On the bench today, a Brilhart Ebolin “Special” (Serial 231851) for Alto saxophone

This was a personal project of mine. I must say straight away that it would not make economical sense for my customers to ask for this sort of modifications to a cheap ($30) plastic mouthpiece like this one.

My goal with this work was to transform the humble Ebolin “Special” into something closer to its more respected brother the Ebolin “Great Neck”.

I started by sanding down the numerous scratches all over the body and I then set out on getting rid of the teeth marks on the beak by adding a marbled white acrylic bite plate.

Once the cosmetic side were dealt with, I opened up the tip to a size 6 and applied a modern radial facing curve with a medium facing length.

Finally, I did extensive work on the baffle, throat, chamber and window. The interior of the mouthpiece was completely skewed and balancing the baffle was a bigger task than I initially anticipated!

Did I achieve my goal? Sort of, this piece plays beautifully after the transformation and it is definitely a keeper but it would be foolish to think that a $30 piece can outperform the best of Ebolins from the Great Neck era.

On the bench today, a Saxscape Prototype SL .102” (Serial 2769) for Tenor saxophone

This is the first Saxscape mouthpiece i got on my bench and I must say I was pleasantly surprised by it. The delrin material is dense and heavy giving a good “singing” quality to this piece.

Upon inspection, I identified a few defects, namely a concave table and an uneven facing curve, that reduced the projection of this piece.

After refacing, this piece has considerable more projection but kept a dark character to its sound.

On the bench today, an AM Mouthpieces Blue Heron 7 for Tenor saxophone

Another cool player from Arnold Montgomery. This time, the Blue Heron model in hybrid material. This particular piece had no major flaws except for a slight unbalance along the curve, a thicker side rail and an uneven tip rail.

After these minor corrections, the mouthpiece plays more efficiently.

On the bench today, an AM Mouthpieces CB6 7* Cocobolo/Hybrid for Tenor saxophone

Here is another stunningly beautiful piece by Arnold Montgomery. According to the owner, this piece is called “CB6” but it is actually an Ankh 7*. My customer explained that it was too resistant for him and his chops were not lasting long with this piece.

Upon inspection, I realised that the tip opening was slightly too big at .110” and some minor issues along the facing curve made this piece inefficient. Following discussion with the owner, he decided to go for a tip opening of .100” based on his other pieces.

I reduced the tip accordingly and lowered the baffle by a tiny amount to balance and re-voice the piece completely.

After refacing, this piece plays with a dark and lush tone with insanely beautiful sub-tones. This is the ideal piece for small venues when you want to play close to your audience.

On the bench today, a Theo Wanne NYBros2 6 for Alto saxophone

This piece was slightly too open for my client’s daughter. Upon inspection, I also identified a few issues along the facing curve towards the tip. Furthermore, the table was not perfectly flat and the facing length was too long which resulted in a “muddy” tone.

The tip opening was reduced to 5* and the facing length was reduced to provide a good balance of highs, mids and lows. A new radial curve was applied to perfectly match the new tip opening and facing length. Finally, the side rails and tip rail were trimmed to improve response.

This piece has a great free blowing feel and plays with a dark but full tone.

On the bench today, a Pillinger “PL” model 7 for Tenor saxophone

This piece had an out of shape tip which made alignment of the reed a little problematic.

I reshaped the tip to facilitate placement of reed.

Everything else was absolutely spot on with a beautiful original curve by Ed Pillinger. This is a great option if you are looking for a bright bu focused piece with a deep core!

On the bench today, a Pillinger “HB” model 7 for Tenor saxophone

This piece had a tiny chip on the tip rail which had no real impact on the sound or playability but it was an eye sore on this beautiful piece.

I filled-in the chip using black Apoxy (not to be confused with Epoxy resine) and reshaped the tip rail.

Everything else was absolutely spot on with a beautiful original curve by Ed Pillinger. This is a very very very nice piece!

(I actually forgot to take a picture of he final work…)

On the bench today, a Pillinger “CP” model 5* for Alto saxophone

This piece had no major defects other than a very uneven tip rail and one side rail considerably thicker than the other one.

I corrected both issues to improve articulation and response.

The “CP” standards for Charlie Parker and this is one of, if not, the best vintage Ebolin replica I have seen so far. This is a fantastic piece if you are looking for that Brilhart sound of the Bebop era.

On the bench today, a SopranoPlanet Missing Link for Soprano saxophone

This appears to be a popular piece in the soprano world. Unfortunately, this particular piece had several issues along the facing curve. Also, the tip rail was uneven and too thick.

I applied a new facing curve, corrected unevenness on the tip rail and thinned it down to improve articulation.

After refacing, this piece is an absolute monster with a massive amount of projection and power.

On the bench today, an AM Mouthpieces Ankh 7* for Tenor saxophone

This piece had no major defects other than the fact that it was way too open for a 7* tip opening. It actually measured .0113” which is closer to 8*. The owner wanted to reduce the tip opening to .105”.

The tip was reduced by sanding down the table. Then a new facing curve was applied and the baffle was slightly reduced to match the new tip opening. The thickness of the side rails was also balanced to match both sides.

On the bench today, a Pillinger “S” Model for Soprano saxophone

This is a great Soloist inspired mouthpiece. This particular piece had a very uneven tip rail and the tip opening was slightly too big for the owner.

I completely re-voiced and re-balanced this piece with a new radial facing, some work on the baffle (especially the edges) and a new tip rail for precise articulation.

This plays with a beautiful sweet tone. I recommend this piece if you are on the lookout for a nice Soloist replica.

On the bench today, an AM Mouthpieces Luna 6 for Alto saxophone

This piece had no major defects other than the fact that it was too open compare to a standard 6 tip opening so the owner wanted to reduce the tip opening a little.

The tip was reduced by sanding down the table. Then a new facing curve was applied and the baffle was slightly reduced to match the new tip opening.

Nice piece for straight-ahead jazz.

On the bench today, an AM Mouthpiece Luna 7 Hybrid in Cocobolo wood for Soprano saxophone

These are, in my opinion, the most beautiful mouthpieces currently on the market. Arnold does an amazing job on these, they are simply stunning to look at and the cocobolo wood is dried to perfection so they should be pretty stable over time.

The owner of this piece explained to me that it was too resistant for him and felt too big.

Upon initial inspection and play testing, I quickly realised that the tip opening was indeed too big. It was 0.075” instead of 0.065” for a normal AM Tip 7 opening. On further inspection, the table was slightly convex at the junction between the wood/resin sections and the facing length was unbalanced. These were not massive individual errors (with the exception of the tip opening) but when all combined it made this piece a lot harder to play than originally designed.

I flattened the table, decreased the tip, corrected the facing length, applied a new radial facing curve, balanced the baffle, trimmed the side rails, reshaped the tip rail and increased the sensation of free blowing by thinning the wind rail.

This piece now plays easily with a big dark sound as originally intended.

On the bench today, a Vandoren V16 T7 for Tenor saxophone

This piece was part of a set of 3 Vandoren V16 mouthpieces (soprano, alto & tenor) from one customer. The idea was to make them play similarly to minimise differences in sensations when switching horns.

On the tenor piece, my customer had no specific instruction except that he mentioned in likes the sound of Dexter Gordon.

The sound of Dexter Gordon is very often characterized as medium dark, mellow, rich, spacious, haunting, etc. In order to achieve this sort of sound, I decided to keep the facing length as-is but corrected for unevenness, and I applied a free blowing radial curve. The main work was done on the baffle and particularly of the edges of the baffle where it meets the side walls of the mouthpiece. These 2 areas were unbalanced and going upward. I flattened the sides of the baffle to bring them to the same height as the rest of the baffle which darken the sound slightly without changing the nice edge that the rest of the baffle is bringing

The piece now plays with a darker tone and plays evenly throughout the whole range of the instrument at pianissimo.

On the bench today, a Vandoren V16 A7 Small Chamber for Alto saxophone

This piece was part of a set of 3 Vandoren V16 mouthpieces (soprano, alto & tenor) from one customer. The idea was to make them play similarly to minimise differences in sensations when switching horns.

On the alto piece, my customer mentioned that it was stuffy and the sound was constricted. He also wanted the tip opening to be increased from .078” to .087”.

Upon initial inspection, it was clear that the original facing curve was less than ideal and the table was quite significantly concave (as seen in the second photograph). This piece required a lot of work to bring to the standard requested by my customer.

I flattened the table, open the tip, increased the facing length, applied a new radial facing curve, shaped a small rollover baffle to bring liveliness to the sound, trimmed the side rails, reshaped the tip rail and revoiced the piece by working on the throat and window areas.

This is now a power house of a piece with a colorful sound.

On the bench today, a Vandoren V16 S8 Small Chamber for Soprano saxophone

This piece was part of a set of 3 Vandoren V16 mouthpieces (soprano, alto & tenor) from one customer. The idea was to make them play similarly to minimise differences in sensations when switching horns.

On the soprano piece, my customer had no specific instruction except that he mentioned in likes the sound of Olivier Franc.

In my opinion, Olivier France, like Sidney Bechet, has a dark, rich and lush sound which is difficult to attain with a small chamber mouthpiece. In order to achieve this sort of sound and given the constraints of the mouthpiece design, I decided to increase the facing length slightly, balance and reduce the baffle by a small amount and apply a free blowing facing curve.

The piece now plays with a richer and darker core in a similar vein of sound to Olivier France.

On the bench today, a Brilhart Ebolin 3* for Bb Clarinet

These are affordable pieces for jazz doublers on the clarinet. However, they are poorly faced (which is expected given the price!).

On this particular piece, the table was very concave, the facing was completely off and the facing length was too short.

After full correction and thinning of the tip rail, this piece plays ideally for saxophone players in big bands who double on the clarinet. It responds similarly to a saxophone mouthpiece for easy transition.

Get in touch in you are facing issues with your clarinet mouthpiece!

On the bench today, a Yanagisawa “Jazz” 5 for Alto saxophone

My customer initially wanted an 8 tip opening mouthpiece but could not find one within his budget. He eventually found 5 tip which was cheap enough and given my low refacing rates, I made him an 8 tip to his own specifications with a radial curve, thin side rails and a small rollover baffle that fit within his budget.

This piece is rocking and will last him a long time. Get in touch if you are in a similar situation.

It is now on its way back to Australia!

On the bench today, an “Early Babbitt” Otto Link “Super” Tone Master 7 for Tenor saxophone

This piece was a bit of a challenge. It had previously been worked on by someone who was not a refacer, probably a DIY project gone bad, and it resulted in a multitude of problems. The table was concave, the rails were completely unbalanced, the facing length was extremely long, the baffle had sanded down, the tip rail was very thick and uneven, etc.

After a considerable amount of work including reshaping of a baffle, this piece was brought back to life and plays really well (I also restored the biteplate for free because I thought it deserved it)! It is a shame it has been modified initially, I have the feeling it was a superb player to start with.

On the bench today, a Woodwind Co. Educator B5* for Alto saxophone

This was such a nice project to work on. My customer gave me “carte blanche” on this piece. He only told that he wanted an open and wild piece. Knowing his preferences and his style of playing from previous refacing works I did for him, I set out on this project.

I started by opening the tip from 0.078” to 0.090”, I opened the window quite significantly, corrected the throat and crafted a small rollover baffle.

After the main work was done, I trimmed the side rails, shaped the tip rail and polished the exterior of the piece.

This piece plays huge and it was one of the most exciting project in recent months.

On the bench today, an Otto Link Tone Edge “V” 6* for Tenor saxophone

This piece had a big tip opening of 0.111″ with a very short facing length of 44mm and the table was not flat.

I sanded down the table to flatten it, increased the facing length and applied a custom radial curve for a 0.108″ tip opening.

This piece is free blowing with a nice thick core.

On the bench today, an Otto Link Tone Edge 5 “New Vintage” Series for Tenor Saxophone (Serial 4938)

This piece initially had a tip opening of 0.078” and my customer wanted it opened up to 0.105”.

This is one of the most extreme tip opening I did recently and probably the longest job I have done so far. My customer wanted this piece to sound on the darker side of the spectrum which meant that I was treading on a thin line between a full and a tubby sound.

The baffle work was critical to achieve the sound requested by my customer and I proceeded very carefully with play testing each time after removing tiny amounts of material. I am really pleased with the result.

This piece is now going back to Australia.

On the bench today, a RS Berkeley Legend Series “Chris Potter” for Tenor saxophone

This piece was completely unbalanced and the table was uneven which resulted in a tubby sound.

I flattened the table, balanced the side rails and reshaped the tip.

After full refacing, the mouthpiece sounds fuller and has a much more lively character.

It is off to South Korea now!

On the bench today, a vintage Meyer NY 5M for Alto saxophone

This piece was previously fitted with a badly done step baffle made of epoxy. The owner wanted it removed without altering the original facing, baffle or chamber geometry.

As most people interested in saxophone mouthpieces would know, this is a rather expensive piece these days so I had to proceed very carefully to avoid any mistakes. After carefully protecting every parts of the mouthpiece, the layers of epoxy were slowly removed and a slight polish was applied.

This piece is now back with its owner and plays as it was originally intended to.

Get in touch if you are in a similar situation. I can help you restore your mouthpiece.

On the bench today, a SYOS Custom “186-AE5” for Alto saxophone

This piece went through the usual full refacing package to remove any 3D printing marks in areas coming into contact with the reed.

On the bench today, a SYOS Signature “P3M-19022” for Alto saxophone

This piece went through the usual full refacing package to remove any 3D printing marks in areas coming into contact with the reed.

This piece is absolutely fantastic!!!

On the bench today, a SYOS Custom “AXLtaS-19024” for Alto saxophone

This piece went through the usual full refacing package to remove any 3D printing marks in areas coming into contact with the reed.

On the bench today, a Berg Larsen HR 85 1 SMS for Alto saxophone

This piece was an unplayable mess with super thick side rails, a tip opening of .098”, a warped tip and a few other issues.

After an extensive amount of work and a few finishing touches and it will be ready to go back to its owner.

Get in touch for a refacing consultation.

On the bench today, a SYOS Custom “Sx2-0.4 27326” for Tenor saxophone

The owner of this piece worked with the SYOS designers to recreate a Navarro Bebop Special mouthpiece. The owner was essentially happy with the final design that sounded almost identical to his Navarro mouthpiece but found that the SYOS Custom lacked core and body to the sound.

After the full refacing and table flattening treatment, this piece is as close as it gets to a real Navarro Bebop Special.

On the bench today, yet an other Selmer Super Session “F” for Soprano saxophone

It is no secret, this is one of my favorite mouthpiece to work on for soprano saxophone. I simply love the versatility of this design and the elegant sound it produces.

This piece was initially a ‘F” tip opening with some serious issues on the facing. The piece was open to .066” which is similar to an “I” opening, and in my opinion the sweet spot for the Super Session.

Get in touch if you have a Super Session soprano piece. Refacing will make a huge difference in your sound and you will never need another soprano mouthpiece after that!

On the bench today, a SYOS “Dayna Stephens” 7 for Soprano saxophone

Yet another great design from the folks at SYOS. This large chamber mouthpiece delivers an in-tune, deep, warm, dark tone with incredible projection. More often than not, large chamber mouthpieces are out of tune in the upper register and/or do not project but this piece is the exception to the rule.

The original facing curve was one of the best I have seen from an original SYOS mouthpiece but the texture on the table generated what I have been calling the “hollow buzz” sound which made this piece sound very thin.

After smoothing out the 3D printing marks and applying a gentle radial curve, this piece plays as intended with a good core, tones of power and a dark tone.

On the bench today, a Selmer Concept for soprano saxophone

These pieces are excellent for classical music, they are reliable and provide an even and somehow quiet powerful sound for “legit” playing but they do lack character for jazz or pop music.

The good thing with the pieces is that they can be transformed into a powerhouse for Jazz with some clever modifications. The first step is to significantly open the tip; on this particular piece, the tip was open from .042” to 0.060”. Then the facing length needs to be extended and a radial facing curve needs to be applied to increase the sound spectrum. The next 2 steps consist of thinning the tip rail to improve articulation and finally the window needs to be lengthened to increase projection and power.

This piece is so far the biggest surprise of 2020. I was not expecting the Selmer Concept to react so well to so many modifications. It is now one of my all time favorite piece and sounds like a crossover between a Selmer Soloist and an Otto Link Tone Edge.

Get in touch if you are bored with your Selmer Concept. It does not need to be “one dimensional” and it can be modified to be played in a lot of different settings.

On the bench today, a SYOS “Victor Raimondeau” 6 for Baritone saxophone

After some work, the piece was completely redesigned to flatten the table, lay a proper radial facing curve with a matching tip opening and facing length. The baffle was also adjusted to account for all the other modifications.

The piece now plays as it should with tons of power and a sound on the brighter side of the spectrum to cut through anything you throw at it.


They will play on par with any expensive boutique mouthpieces you can imagine. Despite general belief, material has little impact on your sound (with the obvious exception of metal vs softer materials like hard rubber, plastic, wood, etc.)

On the bench today, a JodyJazz DV 7 for alto saxophone

As seen from the photos, the main issue with this piece was corrosion which went all the way through the gold plating and affected the evenness of the table.

The table ad to be sanded down which revealed that the side rails were unbalanced. A new radial facing curve was applied and the tip rail was re-shaped. Additional minor corrections were also done to the baffle, the side of the window and the edges of the bullet chamber.

Overall, a great, easy blowing mouthpiece with a fat low register and powerful upper register.

On the bench today, a SYOS “Tivon Pennicott” 8 for Tenor saxophone

This is a a great piece from SYOS. It needed the standard “SYOS package” on this to remove the hollow buzz sound and reshape the tip to comply with the curve of the reed.

On the bench today, a SYOS “Victor Raimondeau” 7* for alto saxophone

This piece was not playable when I received it. It was very difficult to blow, it had no projection and the articulation was terrible.

The tip opening has been reduced, the facing has been corrected, the baffle re-balanced and the tip rail re-shaped. The 3D printing texture has also been smoothed out on the table to increase the core sound of this piece.

This piece now plays similarly to the Mouthpiece Cafe NYC that I recently worked in.

On the bench today, a Gottsu Sepia Tone Soloist Jazz G for soprano saxophone

This is a beautiful Soloist inspired soprano mouthpiece handmade in Japan. On this particular piece, I corrected the facing length which was too short and I opened the tip from G to H. The work resulted in increased body and complexity to the sound.

On the bench today, a Mouthpiece Cafe N.Y.C 8 for alto saxophone

The third Meyer inspired piece that I had recently.This piece needed a slightly longer facing length to open up the lower register. A new elliptical facing curve was applied to give a slightly vintage feel to the piece. The main work was done on the table which was uneven and affected playability.

On the bench today, a D’Addario Select Jazz 7M for alto saxophone

This is another Meyer inspired piece that can really sing when it is properly set-up. On this particular piece, I corrected the facing length, thinned the side rails and more importantly, I shaped the internal window rail that leads into the chamber.

This particular part is often overlooked but it plays a huge part in how the mouthpiece plays in terms of “stuffiness” or if it feels free-blowing. Most people believe that the facing curve is the issue in the resistance/feedback that the mouthpiece gives to the players but based on my personal experience, the window rail is a major parameter.

On the bench today, one of the underrated gem from the Selmer line-up, the Selmer Spirit 184 for alto saxophone

A Meyer inspired mouthpiece designed with Pierrick Pedron, a French alto jazz player (Check him out, awesome player).

This piece needed minimal work to make it reach its full potential. A slight touch-up of the facing curve and a small re-balancing of the baffle made this piece sing like the best Meyers!

On the bench today, a Riffault 4R stencil for alto saxophone

Technically, there was nothing wrong with this piece. It had been worked on before and the previous refacer did a great job. However, the owner wanted to use this piece in a big band and found that it was too soft and lacked projection. After a full diagnostic, it was clear that this piece was set-up for classical music.

Upon consultation with the owner, I increased the facing length and shaped a small rollover baffle to help projection. The main factor that affected fullness of sound and projection was the window, it was too short. I decided to lengthen the window by a full 2mm which helped take this piece to the next level. This Riffault stencil is now a very capable piece in a big band setting.

Get in touch if you are facing similar problems!

On the bench today, a Berg Larsen 105 2 SMS for Baritone sax

This piece was in need of a new bite plate. The owner decided to go for a dual tone bite plate with black and jade colours for a beautiful marble effect.

Bite plates are made of durable acrylic and are hand polished for a beautiful shine. I offer a wide range of colours with almost unlimited combinations to express your personality!

Get in touch if your piece is in need of a new bite plate!

On the bench today, another SYOS “Chad Lefkowitz-Brown” for Tenor saxophone but this time in 8* tip opening

The “ASC Treatment” really makes these SYOS pieces sing and unleash their true potential. From beautiful sub-tone to screaming altissimo.

Another fantastic player after the refacing work.

On the bench today, a Rafael Navarro Maestra Custom 7* for Tenor saxophone

Initially a fantastic player but sadly it was butchered by a famous refacer who must have had a bad day! The original rollover baffle was completely wiped out and replaced by a concave baffle! Side rails were wide and unbalanced. Tip opening was increased from .105″ to .110″ without customer’s consent.

After an extensive amount of work, the piece was put back to its original playing and cosmetic condition with a .105” tip opening and the original internal shapes.

On the bench today, a SYOS “Zem Audu” 8* for Tenor saxophone

A fantastic player after removing what I call the “hollow buzz” of raw SYOS pieces. As usual, these SYOS pieces really deliver the goods when they are properly set-up.

On the bench today, a SYOS “Chad Lefkowitz-Brown” 7* for Tenor saxophone

A fantastic player after removing what I call the “hollow buzz”. As usual, these SYOS pieces really deliver the goods when they are properly set-up.

On the bench today, a SYOS “Godwin Louis” 7* for Alto saxophone

This is an awesome piece for the price. These SYOS pieces really deliver the goods when they are properly set-up.

On the bench today, an Otto Link Super “Tone” Master 7 for Alto saxophone

This piece had a super short facing length, major issues with the table, the facing length and the throat.

A modern radial curve was applied after flattening the table. The rollover baffle for re-shaped and the window was extensively worked on for ease of play, increased projection and better articulation.

On the bench today, an Otto Link Super “Tone” Master 6* for Soprano saxophone

This piece had a super short facing length and some issues with the table.

A modern radial curve was applied after flattening the table and the rollover baffle for re-balanced and re-shaped for ease of play, increased projection and better articulation.

On the bench today, a vintage Conn from the 1920s for Soprano saxophone

This piece was a complete mess when I got it at the workshop. There was no facing curve to speak off and it needed extensive refacing to bring it back to life.

A new facing curve was applied after flattening the table. This is now a nice dark piece for a vintage conn horn.

On the bench today, a SYOS “Giovanni Chirico” 7 for Baritone saxophone

I flattened the table corrected so unevenness along the curve.

This is a great piece on a budget with a punchy sound and ease of play in all registers.

On the bench today, a Selmer Super Session “I” for Soprano saxophone

These are some of my favorite soprano pieces. They are based on the amazing Soloist design and produce an insanely classy soprano sound in my opinion. Sadly, Selmer piece lack a bit of quality control and they do require a fair amount of work to play to their full potential.

On this particular piece, I applied an Elliptical curve with a special tweak to provide consistent response throughout all registers.

On the bench today, an Arnold Montgomery Vintage Series 7* Baritone saxophone mouthpiece in imitation ivory

The brass extension was custom-made by the Chief Wizard at Atelier W in Montreuil – France.

A full refacing was done to reduce the facing length and make this piece play as intended with very vintage sound. This is a masterpiece from Arnold Montgomery. I urge you to check the Vintage Series out.

On the bench today, SYOS “Sylvain Rifflet” 7* for Tenor saxophone

I was surprised by the quality of this piece out of the box but it still had a few issues to sort out. The table was not perfectly flat and the facing length was too short. After optimization, this piece is now a lot more responsive and plays like any high end handmade pieces out there.

On the bench today, a Theo Wanne Gaia2 for soprano

It seems to be a soprano kind of month!

This particular piece was playing pretty well but upon closer inspection, it had a few defects. After full re-balancing, this piece is now singing as it should with its beautiful and deeply haunting voice.

On the bench today, another rare piece, a King “B” Equa-Tru for soprano

Following a full refacing/re-balancing, it is now playing to its full potential.

On the bench today, an extremely rare Conn S2 for Soprano saxophone from 1929

You don’t see this everyday! These were made for the Conn “Stretched” soprano and are quite significantly shorter than standard soprano mouthpieces to play in tune on this particular horn.

This piece had been badly refaced previously and needed a lot of TLC with full refacing, re-balancing, etc.

It is now waiting to be re-united with the “Stretched” Soprano.

On the bench today, a brand new Sakshama “D” D7 for Soprano saxophone

Although stamped as a D7, actual opening is a D6 (0.066”). Unfortunately, I was not able to open it up to the expected opening due to the lack of material at the tip.

However, I did correct the facing to make it play properly.

On the bench today, a vintage Yanagisawa 7 for Alto saxophone

I opened this piece to 0.081”, flattened the table and removed some of the “stuffiness” that was experienced by its owner. The tip rail was reshaped to improve articulation and a radial curve was applied to improve projection.

Now on its way to be re-united with its owner!

On the bench today, a Meyer 6M for Alto saxophone

We opened this piece from 0.067” to 0.078”, applied a perfect radial curve and gave its Meyer voice back with super fast articulation.

Now on its way back to Malaysia!

On the bench today, a Dukoff D8 for Soprano Saxophone

Unfortunately this piece was very far from a D8 tip opening, closer to D5 in fact and with a very short facing length and no tip rail.

Work done:
– Open tip to .065”, extended facing length and radial curve
– Flattened table
– Thinned tip rail

It’s now ready to go back to its owner with significant improvement of power, projection and articulation.

On the bench today, a CG Syracuse “Small Chamber” 6S for Alto saxophone

Work done:
– Balanced rails
– New radial curve
– Reshaped tip rail

This is a fantastic mouthpiece with a full and warm sound with the brightness of the old Meyer Bros NY pieces.

On the bench today, the “humble” Brilhart Tonaline Alto 3* for Alto saxophone

Work done:
– Open to 0.075”
– New radial curve
– Reshaped tip rail

Great value for money vintage pieces. They are not as expensive as the “Streamline” version played by Charlie Parker but still pack a great vintage sound!

This is a personal piece of mine and it is not going anywhere for now.

On the bench today, an ARB Great Neck Original “Custom” 5* for Alto saxophone

Work done:
– Flatten table
– Open from 0.065” to 0.075”
– New radial curve
– Reshaped tip rail
– Thinned side rails

Great Neck Original Mouthpieces are made from blanks of the 1940’s. These are large and medium baffle mouthpieces giving an old school kind of sound. We love the “West Coast vibe” they produce.

On the bench today, an Otto Link ToneEdge 6 for Alto saxophone

Work done:
– Flatten table
– Open to 0.075”
– New radial curve
– Reshaped tip rail
– Thinned side rails
– Reshaped baffle & throat

These modern Otto Links are excellent value for money when they are properly set-up.

On the bench today, 2 Beechler Bellites 7 & 8 for Alto saxophone

Two modern production pieces but built very differently. The #8 tip opening was significantly longer and with a lot more material at the tip. It makes it a much better player.

… And yes, we now work on Stainless Steel pieces on a case by case basis.

Avel Sound Concept
20 Jalan Hajijah
01-29 Laguna Green
Singapore 468726

AvelSoundConcept@gmail.com
+65 9338 4608 (Whatsapp)